Facing East from Indian Country Book
Score: 4
From 1 Ratings

Facing East from Indian Country


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release Date : 2009-06-01
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 317
  • ISBN 10 : 9780674042728

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Facing East from Indian Country Excerpt :

In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers. Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In Facing East from Indian Country, Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States. Viewed from Indian country, the sixteenth century was an era in which Native people discovered Europeans and struggled to make sense of a new world. Well into the seventeenth century, the most profound challenges to Indian life came less from the arrival of a relative handful of European colonists than from the biological, economic, and environmental forces the newcomers unleashed. Drawing upon their own traditions, Indian communities reinvented themselves and carved out a place in a world dominated by transatlantic European empires. In 1776, however, when some of Britain's colonists rebelled against that imperial world, they overturned the system that had made Euro-American and Native coexistence possible. Eastern North America only ceased to be an Indian country because the revolutionaries denied the continent's first peoples a place in the nation they were creating. In rediscovering early America as Indian country, Richter employs the historian's craft to challenge cherished assumptions about times and places we thought we knew well, revealing Native American experiences at the core of the nation's birth and identity.

Facing East from Indian Country Book
Score: 4
From 1 Ratings

Facing East from Indian Country


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Unknown
  • Release Date : 2008-06-05
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 317
  • ISBN 10 : 143529775X

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Facing East from Indian Country Excerpt :

Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

Facing East from Indian Country Book
Score: 4
From 1 Ratings

Facing East from Indian Country


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Unknown
  • Release Date : 2003
  • Genre: Uncategoriezed
  • Pages : 317
  • ISBN 10 : OCLC:1322947159

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Facing East from Indian Country Excerpt :

Facing East from Indian Country Book
Score: 4
From 1 Ratings

Facing East from Indian Country


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Unknown
  • Release Date : 2003
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 317
  • ISBN 10 : 0674011171

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Facing East from Indian Country Excerpt :

Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

The Ordeal of the Longhouse Book

The Ordeal of the Longhouse


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Release Date : 2011-05-01
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 454
  • ISBN 10 : 9780807867914

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The Ordeal of the Longhouse Excerpt :

Richter examines a wide range of primary documents to survey the responses of the peoples of the Iroquois League--the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas, and Tuscaroras--to the challenges of the European colonialization of North America. He demonstrates that by the early eighteenth century a series of creative adaptations in politics and diplomacy allowed the peoples of the Longhouse to preserve their cultural autonomy in a land now dominated by foreign powers.

How the Indians Lost Their Land Book

How the Indians Lost Their Land


  • Author : Stuart Banner
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release Date : 2005
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 366
  • ISBN 10 : 0674018710

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How the Indians Lost Their Land Excerpt :

Argues that the first land deals between Englishmen and Native Americans were lawful real estate transactions based on the definition of what was legal at the time.

Trade  Land  Power Book

Trade Land Power


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Release Date : 2013-04-24
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 328
  • ISBN 10 : 9780812208306

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Trade Land Power Excerpt :

In this sweeping collection of essays, one of America's leading colonial historians reinterprets the struggle between Native peoples and Europeans in terms of how each understood the material basis of power. Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in eastern North America, Natives and newcomers alike understood the close relationship between political power and control of trade and land, but they did so in very different ways. For Native Americans, trade was a collective act. The alliances that made a people powerful became visible through material exchanges that forged connections among kin groups, villages, and the spirit world. The land itself was often conceived as a participant in these transactions through the blessings it bestowed on those who gave in return. For colonizers, by contrast, power tended to grow from the individual accumulation of goods and landed property more than from collective exchange—from domination more than from alliance. For many decades, an uneasy balance between the two systems of power prevailed. Tracing the messy process by which global empires and their colonial populations could finally abandon compromise and impose their definitions on the continent, Daniel K. Richter casts penetrating light on the nature of European colonization, the character of Native resistance, and the formative roles that each played in the origins of the United States.

The French Revolution as a Moment of Respatialization Book

The French Revolution as a Moment of Respatialization


  • Author : Matthias Middell
  • Publisher : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
  • Release Date : 2019-09-23
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 262
  • ISBN 10 : 9783110620290

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The French Revolution as a Moment of Respatialization Excerpt :

The French Revolution has primarily been understood as a national event that also had a lasting impact in Europe and in the Atlantic world. Recently, historiography has increasingly emphasized how France’s overseas colonies also influenced the contours of the French Revolution. This volume examines the effects of both dimensions on the reorganization of spatial formats and spatial orders in France and in other societies. It departs from the assumption that revolutions shatter not only the political and economic old regime order at home but, in an increasingly interdependent world, also result in processes of respatialization. The French Revolution, therefore, is analysed as a key event in a global history that seeks to account for the shifting spatial organization of societies on a transregional scale.

Historic Contact Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

Historic Contact


  • Author : Robert Steven Grumet
  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Release Date : 1995
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 556
  • ISBN 10 : 0806127007

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Historic Contact Excerpt :

Historic Contact divides native northeastern America into three subregions where the histories of thirty-four "Indian Countries" are described and mapped in detail, including all National Historic Landmarks. In the North Atlantic Region are the Eastern and Western Abenaki, Pocumtuck-Squakheag, Nipmuck, Pennacook-Pawtucket, Massachusett, Wampanoag, Narragansett, Mohegan-Pequot, Montauk, Lower Connecticut Valley, and Mahican Indian Countries; in the Middle Atlantic Region, the Munsee, Delaware, Nanticoke, Piscataway-Potomac, Powhatan, Nottoway-Meherrin, Upper Potomac-Shenandoah, Virginian Piedmont, Southern Appalachian Highlands, and Lower Susquehanna Indian Countries; and in the Trans-Appalachian Region, the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Niagara-Erie, Upper Susquehanna, and Upper Ohio Indian Countries.

Unworthy Republic  The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory Book

Unworthy Republic The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory


  • Author : Claudio Saunt
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release Date : 2020-03-24
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 416
  • ISBN 10 : 9780393609851

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Unworthy Republic The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory Excerpt :

A masterful and unsettling history of “Indian Removal,” the forced migration of Native Americans across the Mississippi River in the 1830s and the state-sponsored theft of their lands. In May 1830, the United States formally launched a policy to expel Native Americans from the East to territories west of the Mississippi River. Justified as a humanitarian enterprise, the undertaking was to be systematic and rational, overseen by Washington’s small but growing bureaucracy. But as the policy unfolded over the next decade, thousands of Native Americans died under the federal government’s auspices, and thousands of others lost their possessions and homelands in an orgy of fraud, intimidation, and violence. Unworthy Republic reveals how expulsion became national policy and describes the chaotic and deadly results of the operation to deport 80,000 men, women, and children. Drawing on firsthand accounts and the voluminous records produced by the federal government, Saunt’s deeply researched book argues that Indian Removal, as advocates of the policy called it, was not an inevitable chapter in U.S. expansion across the continent. Rather, it was a fiercely contested political act designed to secure new lands for the expansion of slavery and to consolidate the power of the southern states. Indigenous peoples fought relentlessly against the policy, while many U.S. citizens insisted that it was a betrayal of the nation’s values. When Congress passed the act by a razor-thin margin, it authorized one of the first state-sponsored mass deportations in the modern era, marking a turning point for native peoples and for the United States. In telling this gripping story, Saunt shows how the politics and economics of white supremacy lay at the heart of the expulsion of Native Americans; how corruption, greed, and administrative indifference and incompetence contributed to the debacle of its implementation; and how the consequences still resonate today.

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman Book

Peace Came in the Form of a Woman


  • Author : Juliana Barr
  • Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
  • Release Date : 2009-11-30
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 416
  • ISBN 10 : 080786773X

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Peace Came in the Form of a Woman Excerpt :

Revising the standard narrative of European-Indian relations in America, Juliana Barr reconstructs a world in which Indians were the dominant power and Europeans were the ones forced to accommodate, resist, and persevere. She demonstrates that between the 1690s and 1780s, Indian peoples including Caddos, Apaches, Payayas, Karankawas, Wichitas, and Comanches formed relationships with Spaniards in Texas that refuted European claims of imperial control. Barr argues that Indians not only retained control over their territories but also imposed control over Spaniards. Instead of being defined in racial terms, as was often the case with European constructions of power, diplomatic relations between the Indians and Spaniards in the region were dictated by Indian expressions of power, grounded in gendered terms of kinship. By examining six realms of encounter--first contact, settlement and intermarriage, mission life, warfare, diplomacy, and captivity--Barr shows that native categories of gender provided the political structure of Indian-Spanish relations by defining people's identity, status, and obligations vis-a-vis others. Because native systems of kin-based social and political order predominated, argues Barr, Indian concepts of gender cut across European perceptions of racial difference.

The Indian Tipi Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

The Indian Tipi


  • Author : Reginald Laubin
  • Publisher : Unknown
  • Release Date : 1971
  • Genre: Uncategoriezed
  • Pages : 208
  • ISBN 10 : OCLC:469560479

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The Indian Tipi Excerpt :

Before the Revolution Book
Score: 3
From 1 Ratings

Before the Revolution


  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release Date : 2013-05-03
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 555
  • ISBN 10 : 9780674072367

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Before the Revolution Excerpt :

America began, we are often told, with the Founding Fathers, the men who waged a revolution and created a unique place called the United States. We may acknowledge the early Jamestown and Puritan colonists and mourn the dispossession of Native Americans, but we rarely grapple with the complexity of the nation's pre-revolutionary past. In this pathbreaking revision, Daniel Richter shows that the United States has a much deeper history than is apparentÑthat far from beginning with a clean slate, it is a nation with multiple pasts that stretch back as far as the Middle Ages, pasts whose legacies continue to shape the present. Exploring a vast range of original sources, Before the Revolution spans more than seven centuries and ranges across North America, Europe, and Africa. Richter recovers the lives of a stunning array of peoplesÑIndians, Spaniards, French, Dutch, Africans, EnglishÑas they struggled with one another and with their own people for control of land and resources. Their struggles occurred in a global context and built upon the remains of what came before. Gradually and unpredictably, distinctive patterns of North American culture took shape on a continent where no one yet imagined there would be nations called the United States, Canada, or Mexico. By seeing these trajectories on their own dynamic terms, rather than merely as a prelude to independence, Richter's epic vision reveals the deepest origins of American history.

Who Owns Native Culture  Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

Who Owns Native Culture


  • Author : Michael F. Brown
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release Date : 2009-07-01
  • Genre: Political Science
  • Pages : 338
  • ISBN 10 : 0674028880

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Who Owns Native Culture Excerpt :

"Documents the efforts of indigenous peoples to redefine heritage as a protected resource. Michael Brown takes readers into settings where native peoples defend what they consider to be their cultural property ... By focusing on the complexity of actual cases, Brown casts light on indigenous grievances in diverse fields ... He finds both genuine injustice and, among advocates for native peoples, a troubling tendency to mimic the privatizing logic of major corporations"--Jacket.

An Indigenous Peoples  History of the United States Book
Score: 3.5
From 15 Ratings

An Indigenous Peoples History of the United States


  • Author : Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
  • Publisher : Beacon Press
  • Release Date : 2015-08-11
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 313
  • ISBN 10 : 9780807057834

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An Indigenous Peoples History of the United States Excerpt :

New York Times Bestseller Now part of the HBO docuseries "Exterminate All the Brutes," written and directed by Raoul Peck Recipient of the American Book Award The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. With growing support for movements such as the campaign to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples’ Day and the Dakota Access Pipeline protest led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States is an essential resource providing historical threads that are crucial for understanding the present. In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.” Spanning more than four hundred years, this classi