Farewell to Manzanar Book
Score: 3.5
From 33 Ratings

Farewell to Manzanar


  • Author : Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston
  • Publisher : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Release Date : 2002
  • Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Pages : 216
  • ISBN 10 : 0618216200

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Farewell to Manzanar Excerpt :

The American-born author describes her family's experiences and impressions when they were forced to relocate to a camp for the Japanese in Owens Valley, California, called Manzanar, during World War II, detailing how she, among others, survived in a place of oppression, confusion, and humiliation. Reissue.

Farewell To Manzanar Book
Score: 3.5
From 22 Ratings

Farewell To Manzanar


  • Author : Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston
  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Release Date : 2013-06-18
  • Genre: Young Adult Nonfiction
  • Pages : 208
  • ISBN 10 : 9780547528618

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Farewell To Manzanar Excerpt :

During World War II a community called Manzanar was hastily created in the high mountain desert country of California, east of the Sierras. Its purpose was to house thousands of Japanese American internees. One of the first families to arrive was the Wakatsukis, who were ordered to leave their fishing business in Long Beach and take with them only the belongings they could carry. For Jeanne Wakatsuki, a seven-year-old child, Manzanar became a way of life in which she struggled and adapted, observed and grew. For her father it was essentially the end of his life. At age thirty-seven, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston recalls life at Manzanar through the eyes of the child she was. She tells of her fear, confusion, and bewilderment as well as the dignity and great resourcefulness of people in oppressive and demeaning circumstances. Written with her husband, Jeanne delivers a powerful first-person account that reveals her search for the meaning of Manzanar. Farewell to Manzanar has become a staple of curriculum in schools and on campuses across the country. Last year the San Francisco Chronicle named it one of the twentieth century’s 100 best nonfiction books from west of the Rockies. First published in 1973, this new edition of the classic memoir of a devastating Japanese American experience includes an inspiring afterword by the authors.

Snow Mountain Passage Book
Score: 4
From 1 Ratings

Snow Mountain Passage


  • Author : James D. Houston
  • Publisher : Knopf
  • Release Date : 2007-12-18
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Pages : 336
  • ISBN 10 : 9780307427823

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Snow Mountain Passage Excerpt :

Snow Mountain Passage is a powerful retelling of the most dramatic of our pioneer stories—the ordeal of the Donner Party, with its cast of young and old risking all, its imprisoning snows, its rumors of cannibalism. James Houston takes us inside this central American myth in a compelling new way that only a novelist can achieve. The people whose dreams, courage, terror, ingenuity, and fate we share are James Frazier Reed, one of the leaders of the Donner Party, and his wife and four children—in particular his eight-year-old daughter, Patty. From the moment we meet Reed—proud, headstrong, yet a devoted husband and father—traveling with his family in the "Palace Car," a huge, specially built covered wagon transporting the Reeds in grand style, the stage is set for trouble. And as they journey across the country, thrilling to new sights and new friends, coping with outbursts of conflict and constant danger, trouble comes. It comes in the fateful choice of a wrong route, which causes the group to arrive at the foot of the Sierra Nevada too late to cross into the promised land before the snows block the way. It comes in the sudden fight between Reed and a drover—a fight that exiles Reed from the others, sending him solo over the mountains ahead of the storms. We follow Reed during the next five months as he travels around northern California, trying desperately to find means and men to rescue his family. And through the amazingly imagined "Trail Notes" of Patty Reed, who recollects late in life her experiences as a child, we also follow the main group, progressively stranded and starving on the Nevada side of the Sierras. Snow Mountain Passage is an extraordinary tale of pride and redemption. What happens—who dies, who survives, and why—is brilliantly, grippingly told.

Desert Exile Book

Desert Exile


  • Author : Yoshiko Uchida
  • Publisher : University of Washington Press
  • Release Date : 2015-10-29
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 184
  • ISBN 10 : 9780295806532

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Desert Exile Excerpt :

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, everything changed for Yoshiko Uchida. Desert Exile is her autobiographical account of life before and during World War II. The book does more than relate the day-to-day experience of living in stalls at the Tanforan Racetrack, the assembly center just south of San Francisco, and in the Topaz, Utah, internment camp. It tells the story of the courage and strength displayed by those who were interned. Replaces ISBN 9780295961903

Remembering Manzanar Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

Remembering Manzanar


  • Author : Michael L. Cooper
  • Publisher : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Release Date : 2002
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 92
  • ISBN 10 : 0618067787

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Remembering Manzanar Excerpt :

Uses firsthand accounts, oral histories, and essays from school newspapers and yearbooks to tell the story of the Japanese Americans who were sent to live in government-run internments camps during World War II.

Life After Manzanar Book

Life After Manzanar


  • Author : Naomi Hirahara
  • Publisher : Heyday.ORIM
  • Release Date : 2018-04-03
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 290
  • ISBN 10 : 9781597144469

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Life After Manzanar Excerpt :

“A compelling account of the lives of Japanese and Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II . . . instructive and moving.”—Nippon.com From the editor of the award-winning Children of Manzanar, Heather C. Lindquist, and Edgar Award winner Naomi Hirahara comes a nuanced account of the “Resettlement”: the relatively unexamined period when ordinary people of Japanese ancestry, having been unjustly imprisoned during World War II, were finally released from custody. Given twenty-five dollars and a one-way bus ticket to make a new life, some ventured east to Denver and Chicago to start over, while others returned to Southern California only to face discrimination and an alarming scarcity of housing and jobs. Hirahara and Lindquist weave new and archival oral histories into an engaging narrative that illuminates the lives of former internees in the postwar era, both in struggle and unlikely triumph. Readers will appreciate the painstaking efforts that rebuilding required and will feel inspired by the activism that led to redress and restitution—and that built a community that even now speaks out against other racist agendas. “Through this thoughtful story, we see how the harsh realities of the incarceration experience follow real lives, and how Manzanar will sway generations to come. When you finish the last chapter you will demand to read more.”—Gary Mayeda, national president of the Japanese American Citizens League “An engaging, well-written telling of how former Manzanar detainees played key roles in remembering and righting the wrong of the World War II incarceration.”—Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho

Looking Like the Enemy Book
Score: 4
From 4 Ratings

Looking Like the Enemy


  • Author : Mary Matusda Gruenewald
  • Publisher : Newsage Press
  • Release Date : 2011
  • Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Pages : 253
  • ISBN 10 : 0939165589

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Looking Like the Enemy Excerpt :

Mary Matsuda is a typical 16-year-old girl living on Vashon Island, Washington with her family. On December 7, 1942, the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor, and Mary's life changes forever. Mary and her brother, Yoneichi, are U.S. citizens, but they are imprisoned, along with their parents, in a Japanese-American internment camp. Mary endures an indefinite sentence behind barbed wire in crowded, primitive camps, struggling for survival and dignity. Mary wonders if they will be killed, or if they will one day return to their beloved home and berry farm. The author tells her story with the passion and spirit of a girl trying to make sense of this terrible injustice to her and her family. Mary captures the emotional and psychological essence of what it was like to grow up in the midst of this profound dislocation, questioning her Japanese and her American heritage. Few other books on this subject come close to the emotional power, raw honesty, and moral significance of this memoir. This personal story provides a touchstone for the young student learning about World War II and this difficult chapter in U.S. history.

Southland Book
Score: 4.5
From 4 Ratings

Southland


  • Author : Nina Revoyr
  • Publisher : Akashic Books
  • Release Date : 2008-04-01
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Pages : 350
  • ISBN 10 : 9781936070480

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Southland Excerpt :

"[A]n absolutely compelling story of family and racial tragedy. Revoyr’s novel is honest in detailing southern California’s brutal history, and honorable in showing how families survived with love and tenacity and dignity." —Susan Straight, author of Highwire Moon Southland brings us a fascinating story of race, love, murder and history, against the backdrop of an ever-changing Los Angeles. A young Japanese-American woman, Jackie Ishida, is in her last semester of law school when her grandfather, Frank Sakai, dies unexpectedly. While trying to fulfill a request from his will, Jackie discovers that four African-American boys were killed in the store Frank owned during the Watts Riots of 1965. Along with James Lanier, a cousin of one of the victims, Jackie tries to piece together the story of the boys’ deaths. In the process, she unearths the long-held secrets of her family’s history. Southland depicts a young woman in the process of learning that her own history has bestowed upon her a deep obligation to be engaged in the larger world. And in Frank Sakai and his African-American friends, it presents characters who find significant common ground in their struggles, but who also engage each other across grounds—historical and cultural—that are still very much in dispute. Moving in and out of the past—from the internment camps of World War II, to the barley fields of the Crenshaw District in the 1930s, to the streets of Watts in the 1960s, to the night spots and garment factories of the 1990s—Southland weaves a tale of Los Angeles in all of its faces and forms. Nina Revoyr is the author of The Necessary Hunger ("Irresistible."—Time Magazine). She was born in Japan, raised in Tokyo and Los Angeles, and is of Japanese and Polish-American descent. She lives and works in Los -Angeles.

Infamy Book
Score: 4
From 13 Ratings

Infamy


  • Author : Richard Reeves
  • Publisher : Henry Holt and Company
  • Release Date : 2015-04-21
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN 10 : 9780805099393

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Infamy Excerpt :

A LOS ANGELES TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITOR'S CHOICE • Bestselling author Richard Reeves provides an authoritative account of the internment of more than 120,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese aliens during World War II Less than three months after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and inflamed the nation, President Roosevelt signed an executive order declaring parts of four western states to be a war zone operating under military rule. The U.S. Army immediately began rounding up thousands of Japanese-Americans, sometimes giving them less than 24 hours to vacate their houses and farms. For the rest of the war, these victims of war hysteria were imprisoned in primitive camps. In Infamy, the story of this appalling chapter in American history is told more powerfully than ever before. Acclaimed historian Richard Reeves has interviewed survivors, read numerous private letters and memoirs, and combed through archives to deliver a sweeping narrative of this atrocity. Men we usually consider heroes-FDR, Earl Warren, Edward R. Murrow-were in this case villains, but we also learn of many Americans who took great risks to defend the rights of the internees. Most especially, we hear the poignant stories of those who spent years in "war relocation camps," many of whom suffered this terrible injustice with remarkable grace. Racism, greed, xenophobia, and a thirst for revenge: a dark strand in the American character underlies this story of one of the most shameful episodes in our history. But by recovering the past, Infamy has given voice to those who ultimately helped the nation better understand the true meaning of patriotism.

Snow Falling On Cedars Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

Snow Falling On Cedars


  • Author : David Guterson
  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Release Date : 1994-09-12
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN 10 : 9780547545080

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Snow Falling On Cedars Excerpt :

Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award ▪ American Booksellers Association Book of the Year Award "Haunting....A whodunit complete with courtroom maneuvering and surprising turns of evidence and at the same time a mystery, something altogether richer and deeper."—Los Angeles Times San Piedro Island, north of Puget Sound, is a place so isolated that no one who lives there can afford to make enemies. But in 1954 a local fisherman is found suspiciously drowned, and a Japanese American named Kabuo Miyamoto is charged with his murder. In the course of the ensuing trial, it becomes clear that what is at stake is more than a man's guilt. For on San Pedro, memory grows as thickly as cedar trees and the fields of ripe strawberries—memories of a charmed love affair between a white boy and the Japanese girl who grew up to become Kabuo's wife; memories of land desired, paid for, and lost. Above all, San Piedro is haunted by the memory of what happened to its Japanese residents during World War II, when an entire community was sent into exile while its neighbors watched. Gripping, tragic, and densely atmospheric, Snow Falling on Cedars is a masterpiece of suspense—one that leaves us shaken and changed. "Compelling...heart-stopping. Finely wrought, flawlessly written."—New York Times Book Review

Citizen 13660 Book
Score: 3.5
From 5 Ratings

Citizen 13660


  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher : University of Washington Press
  • Release Date : 1983
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 228
  • ISBN 10 : 0295959894

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Citizen 13660 Excerpt :

Drawings with brief comments by the author describe her memories of life in a California internment camp during World War II

The Last Paradise Book

The Last Paradise


  • Author : James D. Houston
  • Publisher : Unknown
  • Release Date : 2000-01
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN 10 : 0806132906

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The Last Paradise Excerpt :

A fire at a geothermal plant near a volcano in Hawaii is blamed on eco-activists, but native Hawaiians accuse developers of angering the volcano's god. Insurance adjustor Travis Doyle flies to the scene, discovers an old love and together they are caught in a volcanic eruption.

Children of Manzanar Book

Children of Manzanar


  • Author : Heather C. Lindquist
  • Publisher : Heyday Books
  • Release Date : 2012
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 146
  • ISBN 10 : 1597141607

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Children of Manzanar Excerpt :

Eleven tumultuous weeks after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, an act that authorized the U.S. Army to undertake the rapid removal of more than one hundred thousand Japanese and Japanese Americans from the West Coast. With only a few weeks' (and sometimes only a few days') notice, families were forced to abandon their homes and, under military escort, be removed to remote and hastily erected compounds, such as Manzanar War RelocationCenter in the California desert. Children of Manzanar/i> captures the experiences of the nearly four thousand children and young adults held at Manzanar during World War II. Quotes from these children, most now in their eighties and nineties, are accompanied by photographs from both official and unofficial photographers, including Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, and Toyo Miyatake, himself an internee who for months secretly documented daily life inside the camp, and then openly for the remaining years Manzanar operated.

Warriors Don t Cry Book
Score: 4
From 33 Ratings

Warriors Don t Cry


  • Author : Melba Beals
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release Date : 2007-07-24
  • Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Pages : 254
  • ISBN 10 : 9781416948827

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Warriors Don t Cry Excerpt :

The author describes the threats and emotional abuse she endured from white student and adults along with her fears of endangering her family as she commited to being one of the first African American students to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957.