How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything Book
Score: 4.5
From 2 Ratings

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything


  • Author : Rosa Brooks
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release Date : 2016-08-09
  • Genre: Political Science
  • Pages : 448
  • ISBN 10 : 9781476777887

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How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything Book Description :

“A dynamic work of reportage” (The New York Times) written “with clarity and...wit” (The New York Times Book Review) about what happens when the ancient boundary between war and peace is erased. Once, war was a temporary state of affairs. Today, America’s wars are everywhere and forever: our enemies change constantly and rarely wear uniforms, and virtually anything can become a weapon. As war expands, so does the role of the US military. Military personnel now analyze computer code, train Afghan judges, build Ebola isolation wards, eavesdrop on electronic communications, develop soap operas, and patrol for pirates. You name it, the military does it. In this “ambitious and astute” (The Washington Post) work, Rosa Brooks “provides a masterful analysis” (San Francisco Chronicle) of this seismic shift in how America wages war from an unconventional perspective—that of a former top Pentagon official who is the daughter of two anti-war protesters and married to an Army Green Beret. By turns a memoir, a work of journalism, a scholarly exploration of history, anthropology, and law, How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything is an “illuminating” (The New York Times), “eloquent” (The Boston Globe), “courageous” (US News & World Report), and “essential” (The Dallas Morning News) examination of the role of the military today. Above all, it is a rallying cry, for Brooks issues an urgent warning: When the boundaries around war disappear, we undermine both America’s founding values and the international rules and organizations that keep our world from sliding towards chaos.

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything Book
Score: 4.5
From 2 Ratings

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything


  • Author : Rosa Brooks
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release Date : 2016
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 438
  • ISBN 10 : 9781476777870

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How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything Book Description :

Inside secure command centers, military officials make life and death decisions-- but the Pentagon also offers food courts, banks, drugstores, florists, and chocolate shops. It is rather symbolic of the way that the U.S. military has become our one-stop-shopping solution to global problems. Brooks traces this seismic shift in how America wages war, and provides a rallying cry for action as we undermine the values and rules that keep our world from sliding toward chaos.

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything Book
Score: 4.5
From 2 Ratings

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything


  • Author : Rosa Brooks
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release Date : 2016-08-09
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 448
  • ISBN 10 : 9781476777863

GET BOOK
How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything Book Description :

Inside secure command centers, military officials make life and death decisions-- but the Pentagon also offers food courts, banks, drugstores, florists, and chocolate shops. It is rather symbolic of the way that the U.S. military has become our one-stop-shopping solution to global problems. Brooks traces this seismic shift in how America wages war, and provides a rallying cry for action as we undermine the values and rules that keep our world from sliding toward chaos.

Tangled Up in Blue Book

Tangled Up in Blue


  • Author : Rosa Brooks
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release Date : 2021-02-09
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN 10 : 9780525557869

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Tangled Up in Blue Book Description :

A radical inside examination of policing in modern America, from a Georgetown University law professor turned reserve police officer In her forties, with two children, a spouse, a dog, a mortgage, and a full-time job as a tenured law professor at Georgetown, Rosa Brooks decided to become a cop. An academic with an enduring interest in law's troubled relationship with violence, Brooks was discouraged by the statistics on police shootings and racial disparities in the criminal justice system; she wanted an insider experience that would enable her to become an advocate for change. But legitimate reasons aside, Brooks knew there was something bigger guiding her decision - she was restless, tired of faculty meetings, and looking for a challenge. And so, she applied to become a Reserve Police Officer with the Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department (MPD), and prepared to go through the same police academy training as the city's career officers, take the same oath, wear the same uniform and badge, carry the same gun, and patrol the same streets - but, as a volunteer. No one thought this was a good idea - not her husband, who had spent more than two decades in the military, or her mother, writer and left-wing activist Barbara Ehrenreich, who distrusted the police. And in 2015, when Brooks first applied to join the DC police, police violence was constantly in the news: there were stories about cruel and corrupt cops, about excessive force, and the staggering number of Americans - a disproportionate number of whom are young, black, and male - being killed by the police. Lines were being drawn and people were taking sides, but, as Brooks found, as she made her way through field training and patrolling, the reality is even more complex that we originally thought. In Tangled Up in Blue, Brooks recounts her experiences at the police academy and on patrol in one of the most crime-ridden parts of the nation's capital. Drawing on these singular experiences, from target practic

The Counterrevolution Book

The Counterrevolution


  • Author : Bernard E. Harcourt
  • Publisher : Basic Books
  • Release Date : 2018-02-27
  • Genre: Political Science
  • Pages : 336
  • ISBN 10 : 9781541697270

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The Counterrevolution Book Description :

A distinguished political theorist sounds the alarm about the counterinsurgency strategies used to govern Americans Militarized police officers with tanks and drones. Pervasive government surveillance and profiling. Social media that distract and track us. All of these, contends Bernard E. Harcourt, are facets of a new and radical governing paradigm in the United States--one rooted in the modes of warfare originally developed to suppress anticolonial revolutions and, more recently, to prosecute the war on terror. The Counterrevolution is a penetrating and disturbing account of the rise of counterinsurgency, first as a military strategy but increasingly as a way of ruling ordinary Americans. Harcourt shows how counterinsurgency's principles--bulk intelligence collection, ruthless targeting of minorities, pacifying propaganda--have taken hold domestically despite the absence of any radical uprising. This counterrevolution against phantom enemies, he argues, is the tyranny of our age. Seeing it clearly is the first step to resisting it effectively.

Armed Servants Book

Armed Servants


  • Author : Peter Feaver
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release Date : 2009-07
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 400
  • ISBN 10 : 0674036778

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Armed Servants Book Description :

How do civilians control the military? In the wake of September 11, the renewed presence of national security in everyday life has made this question all the more pressing. In this book, Peter Feaver proposes an ambitious new theory that treats civil-military relations as a principal-agent relationship, with the civilian executive monitoring the actions of military agents, the "armed servants" of the nation-state. Military obedience is not automatic but depends on strategic calculations of whether civilians will catch and punish misbehavior. This model challenges Samuel Huntington's professionalism-based model of civil-military relations, and provides an innovative way of making sense of the U.S. Cold War and post-Cold War experience--especially the distinctively stormy civil-military relations of the Clinton era. In the decade after the Cold War ended, civilians and the military had a variety of run-ins over whether and how to use military force. These episodes, as interpreted by agency theory, contradict the conventional wisdom that civil-military relations matter only if there is risk of a coup. On the contrary, military professionalism does not by itself ensure unchallenged civilian authority. As Feaver argues, agency theory offers the best foundation for thinking about relations between military and civilian leaders, now and in the future.

The Soldier and the Changing State Book

The Soldier and the Changing State


  • Author : Zoltan Barany
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release Date : 2012-09-16
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 456
  • ISBN 10 : 9780691137698

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The Soldier and the Changing State Book Description :

Looking at how armies supportive of democracy are built, this title argues that the military is the important institution that states maintain, for without military elites who support democratic governance, democracy cannot be consolidated. It demonstrates that building democratic armies is the quintessential task of democratizing regimes.

The Bomb Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

The Bomb


  • Author : Fred Kaplan
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release Date : 2020-01-28
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN 10 : 9781982107314

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The Bomb Book Description :

From the author the classic The Wizards of Armageddon and Pulitzer Prize finalist comes the definitive history of American policy on nuclear war—and Presidents’ actions in nuclear crises—from Truman to Trump. Fred Kaplan, hailed by The New York Times as “a rare combination of defense intellectual and pugnacious reporter,” takes us into the White House Situation Room, the Joint Chiefs of Staff’s “Tank” in the Pentagon, and the vast chambers of Strategic Command to bring us the untold stories—based on exclusive interviews and previously classified documents—of how America’s presidents and generals have thought about, threatened, broached, and just barely avoided nuclear war from the dawn of the atomic age until today. Kaplan’s historical research and deep reporting will stand as the permanent record of politics. Discussing theories that have dominated nightmare scenarios from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Kaplan presents the unthinkable in terms of mass destruction and demonstrates how the nuclear war reality will not go away, regardless of the dire consequences.

War on Peace Book

War on Peace


  • Author : Ronan Farrow
  • Publisher : William Collins
  • Release Date : 2019-05
  • Genre:
  • Pages : 432
  • ISBN 10 : 0007575653

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War on Peace Book Description :

A book for anyone interested to know more about how the world really works by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ronan Farrow. 'This is one of the most important books of our time.' Walter Isaacson 'A masterpiece' Dan Simpson, Post-Gazette THE NEW YORK TIMES #3 BESTSELLER US foreign policy is undergoing a dire transformation, forever changing America's place in the world. Institutions of diplomacy and development are bleeding out after deep budget cuts; the diplomats who make America's deals and protect democratic interests around the world are walking out in droves. Offices across the State Department sit empty, while abroad the military-industrial complex has assumed the work once undertaken by peacemakers. Increasingly, America is a nation that shoots first and asks questions later. In an astonishing journey from the corridors of power in Washington, DC, to some of the most remote and dangerous places on earth - Afghanistan, Somalia, and North Korea among them acclaimed investigative journalist Ronan Farrow illuminates one of the most consequential and poorly understood changes in American history. His first-hand experience as a former State Department official affords a personal look at some of the last standard bearers of traditional statecraft, including Richard Holbrooke, who made peace in Bosnia and died while trying to do so in Afghanistan. Drawing on newly unearthed documents, and richly informed by rare interviews with warlords, whistle-blowers, and policymakers - including every living secretary of state from Henry Kissinger to Hillary Clinton to Rex Tillerson - War on Peace makes a powerful case for an endangered profession. Diplomacy, Farrow argues, has declined after decades of political cowardice, short-sightedness, and outright malice - but it may just offer a way out of a world at war.

Forged Through Fire  War  Peace  and the Democratic Bargain Book
Score: 3
From 1 Ratings

Forged Through Fire War Peace and the Democratic Bargain


  • Author : John Ferejohn
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release Date : 2016-12-06
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN 10 : 9781631491610

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Forged Through Fire War Peace and the Democratic Bargain Book Description :

Peace, many would agree, is a goal that democratic nations should strive to achieve. But is democracy, in fact, dependent on war to survive? Having spent their celebrated careers exploring this provocative question, John Ferejohn and Frances McCall Rosenbluth trace the surprising ways in which governments have mobilized armies since antiquity, discovering that our modern form of democracy not only evolved in a brutally competitive environment but also quickly disintegrated when the powerful elite no longer needed their citizenry to defend against existential threats. Bringing to vivid life the major battles that shaped our current political landscape, the authors begin with the fierce warrior states of Athens and the Roman Republic. While these experiments in “mixed government” would serve as a basis for the bargain between politics and protection at the heart of modern democracy, Ferejohn and Rosenbluth brilliantly chronicle the generations of bloodshed that it would take for the world’s dominant states to hand over power to the people. In fact, for over a thousand years, even as medieval empires gave way to feudal Europe, the king still ruled. Not even the advancements of gunpowder—which decisively tipped the balance away from the cavalry-dominated militaries and in favor of mass armies—could threaten the reign of monarchs and “landed elites” of yore. The incredibly wealthy, however, were not well equipped to handle the massive labor classes produced by industrialization. As we learn, the Napoleonic Wars stoked genuine, bottom-up nationalism and pulled splintered societies back together as “commoners” stepped up to fight for their freedom. Soon after, Hitler and Stalin perfectly illustrated the military limitations of dictatorships, a style of governance that might be effective for mobilizing an army but not for winning a world war. This was a lesson quickly heeded by the American military, who would begin to reinforce their ranks with minorities