Hard Time Book

Hard Time


  • Author : Shaun Attwood
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release Date : 2011-05-10
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 320
  • ISBN 10 : 9781628721133

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Hard Time Book Description :

Shaun Attwood was a millionaire day trader in Phoenix, Arizona, but his hedonistic lifestyle of drugs and parties came to an abrupt end in 2002 when a SWAT team broke down his door. Attwood found himself on remand in Maricopa Jail with a $750,000 cash bond and all of his assets seized. The nightmare was only just beginning as he was submerged in a jail in which rival gangs vied for control, crystal meth was freely available, and where breaking rules could result in beatings or death. Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s jails have the highest death rate in the U.S. Hard Time is the harrowing yet darkly humorous account of the time Attwood spent submerged in a nightmarish world of gang violence and insect infested cells, eating food unfit for animals. His remarkable story provides a revealing glimpse into the tragedy, brutality, comedy, and eccentricity of prison life.

U S  Latinos and Criminal Injustice Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

U S Latinos and Criminal Injustice


  • Author : Lupe S. Salinas
  • Publisher : MSU Press
  • Release Date : 2015-07-01
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 378
  • ISBN 10 : 9781628952353

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U S Latinos and Criminal Injustice Book Description :

Latinos in the United States encompass a broad range of racial, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical identities. Originating from the Caribbean, Spain, Central and South America, and Mexico, they have unique justice concerns. The ethnic group includes U.S. citizens, authorized resident aliens, and undocumented aliens, a group that has been a constant partner in the Latino legal landscape for over a century. This book addresses the development and rapid growth of the Latino population in the United States and how race-based discrimination, hate crimes, and other prejudicial attitudes, some of which have been codified via public policy, have grown in response. Salinas explores the degrading practice of racial profiling, an approach used by both federal and state law enforcement agents; the abuse in immigration enforcement; and the use of deadly force against immigrants. The author also discusses the barriers Latinos encounter as they wend their way through the court system. While all minorities face the barrier of racially based jury strikes, bilingual Latinos deal with additional concerns, since limited-English-proficient defendants depend on interpreters to understand the trial process. As a nation rich in ethnic and racial backgrounds, the United States, Salinas argues, should better strive to serve its principles of justice.

Uncertain Times Book

Uncertain Times


  • Author : E. Paul Durrenberger
  • Publisher : University Press of Colorado
  • Release Date : 2017-07-03
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 328
  • ISBN 10 : 9781607326311

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Uncertain Times Book Description :

In this first-ever collection of labor anthropology from around the world, the contributors to Uncertain Times assert that traditional labor unions have been co-opted by neoliberal policies of corporate capital and have become service organizations rather than drivers of social movements. The current structure of labor unions facilitates corporations’ need for a stable labor force while reducing their power to prevent outsourcing, subcontracting, and other methods of undercutting worker security and union power. Through case studies from Switzerland, Israel, Argentina, Mexico, the United States, Greece, Sweden,Turkey, Brazil and Spain, the authors demonstrate that this process of neutering unions has been uneven across time and space. They also show that the potential exists for renewed union power based on more vociferous and creative collective action. These firsthand accounts—from activist anthropologists in the trenches as union members and staff, as well as academics analyzing policy, law, worker organizing, and community impact—illustrate the many approaches that workers around the world are taking to reclaim their rights in this ever-shifting labor landscape. Uncertain Times is the first book to use this crucial comparative, ethnographic approach for understanding the new rules of the global labor struggle and the power workers have to change thoserules. The volume will be of great interest to students and scholars of anthropology, sociology of work,and labor studies; labor union leadership; and others interested in developing innovative methods fororganizing working people, fomenting class consciousness, and expanding social movements. Contributors: Alpkan Birelma, Emma Braden, Maria Eugenia de la O, Christopher Kelley, Staffan Löfving, Gadi Nissim, Darcy Pan, Steven Payne, Alicia Reigada, Julia Soul, Manos Spyridakis, Christian Zlolniski

Border Citizens Book

Border Citizens


  • Author : Eric V. Meeks
  • Publisher : University of Texas Press
  • Release Date : 2019-11-15
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 392
  • ISBN 10 : 9781477319673

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Border Citizens Book Description :

In Border Citizens, historian Eric V. Meeks explores how the racial classification and identities of the diverse indigenous, mestizo, and Euro-American residents of Arizona’s borderlands evolved as the region was politically and economically incorporated into the United States. First published in 2007, the book examines the complex relationship between racial subordination and resistance over the course of a century. On the one hand, Meeks links the construction of multiple racial categories to the process of nation-state building and capitalist integration. On the other, he explores how the region’s diverse communities altered the blueprint drawn up by government officials and members of the Anglo majority for their assimilation or exclusion while redefining citizenship and national belonging. The revised edition of this highly praised and influential study features a chapter-length afterword that details and contextualizes Arizona’s aggressive response to undocumented immigration and ethnic studies in the decade after Border Citizens was first published. Meeks demonstrates that the broad-based movement against these measures had ramifications well beyond Arizona. He also revisits the Yaqui and Tohono O’odham nations on both sides of the Sonora-Arizona border, focusing on their efforts to retain, extend, and enrich their connections to one another in the face of increasingly stringent border enforcement.

Joe s Law Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

Joe s Law


  • Author : Joe ARPAIO
  • Publisher : AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn
  • Release Date : 2008-05-29
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN 10 : 0814401996

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Joe s Law Book Description :

Outspoken, no-nonsense, and eminently fascinating, Joseph M. Arpaio captured the public's imagination from his first day as sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, in 1992. He has become an icon, not only in his own state, but all over the world. For 15 years, he has maintained an unprecedented 80% approval rating. Famous for his “get smart and get tough” approach to jails, “Sheriff Joe,” as he is universally known, conceived The Tent City Jail where he houses his inmates in surplus army tents left over from the Korean War. Known as the “Alcatraz of Arizona,” the jail features chain gangs and stringent discipline. By eliminating all comforts for his inmates, he has managed to shave $500,000 annually from the cost of keeping prisoners. But he also offers a wide range of educational and therapeutic courses for inmates. To his ardent followers, he is a hero for both his toughness on crime and his sense of humanity. While his opponents decry him for his iron-fisted approach, no one can deny that Sheriff Joe is one of the country's most respected elected officials. Joe's Law is an uncensored look by “America's Toughest Sheriff” at some of the most important and difficult issues facing America today. As the first law enforcement official in the country to arrest illegal immigrants, Arpaio tackles illegal immigration head on—how it intertwines with drug trafficking, taxes, and crime, and how it impacts healthcare and education as well. Arpaio offers innovative and fair ways to solve this dilemma and many others, not only in his own state but throughout the country. Compelling and courageous, this is a candid take on some of America's most pressing social problems, and one man's revolutionary vision for eliminating them.

Outside Justice Book

Outside Justice


  • Author : David C Brotherton
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Release Date : 2013-05-27
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 280
  • ISBN 10 : 9781461466482

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Outside Justice Book Description :

Outside Justice: Undocumented Immigrants and the Criminal Justice System fills a clear gap in the scholarly literature on the increasing conceptual overlap between popular perceptions of immigration and criminality, and its reflection in the increasing practical overlap between criminal justice and immigration control systems. Drawing on data from the United States and other nations, scholars from a range of academic disciplines examine the impact of these trends on the institutions, communities, and individuals that are experiencing them. Individual entries address criminal victimization and labor exploitation of undocumented immigrant communities, the effects of parental detention and deportation on children remaining in destination countries, relations between immigrant communities and law enforcement agencies, and the responses of law enforcement agencies to drastic changes in immigration policy, among other topics. Taken as a whole, these essays chart the ongoing progression of social forces that will determine the well-being of Western democracies throughout the 21st century. In doing so, they set forth a research agenda for reexamining and challenging the goals of converging criminal justice and immigration control policy, and raise a number of carefully considered, ethical alternatives to the contemporary policy status quo.​​Contemporary immigration is the focus of highly charged rhetoric and policy innovation, both attempting to define the movement of people across national borders as fundamentally an issue of criminal justice. This realignment has had profound effects on criminal justice policy and practice and immigration control alike, and raises far-reaching implications for social inclusion, labor economies, community cohesion, and a host of other areas of immediate interest to social science researchers and practitioners.

Immigrant America Book
Score: 5
From 2 Ratings

Immigrant America


  • Author : Alejandro Portes
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Release Date : 2006-10-03
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 496
  • ISBN 10 : 0520940482

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Immigrant America Book Description :

This third edition of the widely acclaimed classic has been thoroughly expanded and updated to reflect current demographic, economic, and political realities. Drawing on recent census data and other primary sources, Portes and Rumbaut have infused the entire text with new information and added a vivid array of new vignettes and illustrations. Recognized for its superb portrayal of immigration and immigrant lives in the United States, this book probes the dynamics of immigrant politics, examining questions of identity and loyalty among newcomers, and explores the psychological consequences of varying modes of migration and acculturation. The authors look at patterns of settlement in urban America, discuss the problems of English-language acquisition and bilingual education, explain how immigrants incorporate themselves into the American economy, and examine the trajectories of their children from adolescence to early adulthood. With a vital new chapter on religion—and fresh analyses of topics ranging from patterns of incarceration to the mobility of the second generation and the unintended consequences of public policies—this updated edition is indispensable for framing and informing issues that promise to be even more hotly and urgently contested as the subject moves to the center of national debate..

America s Toughest Sheriff Book

America s Toughest Sheriff


  • Author : Joe Arpaio
  • Publisher : Summit Group
  • Release Date : 1996
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 262
  • ISBN 10 : 1565302028

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America s Toughest Sheriff Book Description :

Overcrowded jails and shrinking budgets equal early release for prisoners in most communities. Not so in Maricopa County, Arizona, where Sheriff Joe Arpaio houses inmates in surplus army tents dating from the Korean War. And while summer temperatures in the desert can reach 120 degrees, Sheriff Joe reasons that if the tents were good enough for the troops of Desert Storm, they are good enough for convicted criminals. America's Toughest Sheriff is an unfiltered account of Sheriff Joe's "get smart and get tough" approach to jail. He believes that criminals should never live better in jail than they do on the outside. Called the "Alcatraz of Arizona," the Tent City Jail features discipline, hard work, and a total absence of frills. By eliminating coffee and feeding convicts sandwiches at lunch, Arpaio has shaved $500,000 annually from the cost of keeping prisoners. And that's only the beginning of the changes he has initiated on his way to achieving an 85 percent approval rating from his constituents. Citizens of the Phoenix area rave about Sheriff Joe's common-sense approach to crime, and about his creative ways to save taxpayers money. More than 2,500 residents have volunteered for his posses, performing duties from rescuing lost hikers to patrolling the malls during the holidays. His innovative leadership in law enforcement is rooted in more than 30 years' experience as a federal drug enforcement agent when he fought the drug trade in Turkey and Central America.

Latino Peoples in the New America Book

Latino Peoples in the New America


  • Author : José A. Cobas
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release Date : 2018-12-10
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 246
  • ISBN 10 : 9780429753633

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Latino Peoples in the New America Book Description :

"Latinos" are the largest group among Americans of color. At 59 million, they constitute nearly a fifth of the US population. Their number has alarmed many in government, other mainstream institutions, and the nativist right who fear the white-majority US they have known is disappearing. During the 2016 US election and after, Donald Trump has played on these fears, embracing xenophobic messages vilifying many Latin American immigrants as rapists, drug smugglers, or "gang bangers." Many share such nativist desires to build enhanced border walls and create immigration restrictions to keep Latinos of various backgrounds out. Many whites’ racist framing has also cast native-born Latinos, their language, and culture in an unfavorable light. Trump and his followers’ attacks provide a peek at the complex phenomenon of the racialization of US Latinos. This volume explores an array of racialization’s manifestations, including white mob violence, profiling by law enforcement, political disenfranchisement, whitewashed reinterpretations of Latino history and culture, and depictions of "good Latinos" as racially subservient. But subservience has never marked the Latino community, and this book includes pointed discussions of Latino resistance to racism. Additionally, the book’s scope goes beyond the United States, revealing how Latinos are racialized in yet other societies.

Are Prisons Obsolete  Book
Score: 4
From 5 Ratings

Are Prisons Obsolete


  • Author : Angela Y. Davis
  • Publisher : Seven Stories Press
  • Release Date : 2011-01-04
  • Genre: Political Science
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN 10 : 9781609801045

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Are Prisons Obsolete Book Description :

With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable. In Are Prisons Obsolete?, Professor Davis seeks to illustrate that the time for the prison is approaching an end. She argues forthrightly for "decarceration", and argues for the transformation of the society as a whole.