What the Dog Saw Book
Score: 4
From 67 Ratings

What the Dog Saw


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Penguin UK
  • Release Date : 2009-10-20
  • Genre: Literary Collections
  • Pages : 432
  • ISBN 10 : 9780141044804

GET BOOK
What the Dog Saw Book Description :

Malcolm Gladwell is the master of playful yet profound insight. His ability to see underneath the surface of the seemingly mundane taps into a fundamental human impulse: curiosity. From criminology to ketchup, job interviews to dog training, Malcolm Gladwell takes everyday subjects and shows us surprising new ways of looking at them, and the world around us. Are smart people overrated? What can pit bulls teach us about crime? Why are problems like homelessness easier to solve than to manage? How do we hire when we can’t tell who’s right for the job? Gladwell explores the minor geniuses, the underdogs and the overlooked, and reveals how everyone and everything contains an intriguing story. What the Dog Saw is Gladwell at his very best – asking questions and seeking answers in his inimitable style.

The Devil and Sherlock Holmes Book
Score: 4
From 26 Ratings

The Devil and Sherlock Holmes


  • Author : David Grann
  • Publisher : Vintage
  • Release Date : 2011
  • Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • Pages : 404
  • ISBN 10 : 9780307275905

GET BOOK
The Devil and Sherlock Holmes Book Description :

Explores unforgettable mysteries and the nature of obsession, from the Aryan Brotherhood's infiltration of the U.S. prison system to a chameleon con artist in Europe to the author's experience with a cyclone while searching for the elusive giant squid.

Theories  Predictions  and Diagnoses Book

Theories Predictions and Diagnoses


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Little, Brown
  • Release Date : 2009-10-20
  • Genre: Psychology
  • Pages : 120
  • ISBN 10 : 9780316086158

GET BOOK
Theories Predictions and Diagnoses Book Description :

!--StartFragment--What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate. "Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary. !--EndFragment--

Obsessives  Pioneers  and Other Varieties of Minor Genius Book
Score: 5
From 1 Ratings

Obsessives Pioneers and Other Varieties of Minor Genius


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Little, Brown
  • Release Date : 2009-10-20
  • Genre: Psychology
  • Pages : 130
  • ISBN 10 : 9780316086141

GET BOOK
Obsessives Pioneers and Other Varieties of Minor Genius Book Description :

!--StartFragment--What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate. "Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary. !--EndFragment--

Personality  Character  and Intelligence Book
Score: 3
From 1 Ratings

Personality Character and Intelligence


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Little, Brown
  • Release Date : 2009-10-20
  • Genre: Psychology
  • Pages : 100
  • ISBN 10 : 9780316086189

GET BOOK
Personality Character and Intelligence Book Description :

!--StartFragment--What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate. "Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary. !--EndFragment--

What the Dog Saw Book

What the Dog Saw


  • Author : Gregory Grissom
  • Publisher :
  • Release Date : 2010
  • Genre:
  • Pages : 8
  • ISBN 10 : OCLC:1151776069

GET BOOK
What the Dog Saw Book Description :

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time Book
Score: 3.5
From 3,814 Ratings

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time


  • Author : Mark Haddon
  • Publisher : Anchor Canada
  • Release Date : 2009-02-24
  • Genre: Fiction
  • Pages : 240
  • ISBN 10 : 9780307371560

GET BOOK
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time Book Description :

Narrated by a fifteen-year-old autistic savant obsessed with Sherlock Holmes, this dazzling novel weaves together an old-fashioned mystery, a contemporary coming-of-age story, and a fascinating excursion into a mind incapable of processing emotions. Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, Christopher is autistic. Everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning for him. At fifteen, Christopher’s carefully constructed world falls apart when he finds his neighbour’s dog Wellington impaled on a garden fork, and he is initially blamed for the killing. Christopher decides that he will track down the real killer, and turns to his favourite fictional character, the impeccably logical Sherlock Holmes, for inspiration. But the investigation leads him down some unexpected paths and ultimately brings him face to face with the dissolution of his parents’ marriage. As Christopher tries to deal with the crisis within his own family, the narrative draws readers into the workings of Christopher’s mind. And herein lies the key to the brilliance of Mark Haddon’s choice of narrator: The most wrenching of emotional moments are chronicled by a boy who cannot fathom emotions. The effect is dazzling, making for one of the freshest debut in years: a comedy, a tearjerker, a mystery story, a novel of exceptional literary merit that is great fun to read.

Theories  Predictions  and Diagnoses Book

Theories Predictions and Diagnoses


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Little, Brown
  • Release Date : 2009-10-20
  • Genre: Psychology
  • Pages : 120
  • ISBN 10 : 9780316086158

GET BOOK
Theories Predictions and Diagnoses Book Description :

!--StartFragment--What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate. "Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary. !--EndFragment--

Personality  Character  and Intelligence Book
Score: 3
From 1 Ratings

Personality Character and Intelligence


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Little, Brown
  • Release Date : 2009-10-20
  • Genre: Psychology
  • Pages : 100
  • ISBN 10 : 9780316086189

GET BOOK
Personality Character and Intelligence Book Description :

!--StartFragment--What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20th century? In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period. Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate. "Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary. !--EndFragment--

Talking to Strangers Book
Score: 4
From 20 Ratings

Talking to Strangers


  • Author : Malcolm Gladwell
  • Publisher : Little, Brown
  • Release Date : 2019-09-10
  • Genre: Social Science
  • Pages : 400
  • ISBN 10 : 9780316535625

GET BOOK
Talking to Strangers Book Description :

A Best Book of the Year: The Financial Times, Bloomberg, Chicago Tribune, and Detroit Free Pres Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Outliers, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers -- and why they often go wrong. How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn't true? While tackling these questions, Malcolm Gladwell was not solely writing a book for the page. He was also producing for the ear. In the audiobook version of Talking to Strangers, you'll hear the voices of people he interviewed--scientists, criminologists, military psychologists. Court transcripts are brought to life with re-enactments. You actually hear the contentious arrest of Sandra Bland by the side of the road in Texas. As Gladwell revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, and the suicide of Sylvia Plath, you hear directly from many of the players in these real-life tragedies. There's even a theme song - Janelle Monae's "Hell You Talmbout." Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don't know. And because we don't know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.